Collection of GIC 1.0 Ideas

Associated Challenge: 

*
#1 written by bikerider
about 2 months ago

Use the Vodka bottles as thermal mass. Fill the bottles with water (leave room for expansion in case of freezing incidents) and stack them flat along the North wall and any other possible location in the greenhouse. They will absorb heat during the day time and radiate it out into the green house at night ameliorating some of the temperature swings
*
#2 written by Tom
about 2 months ago

If the main problem is the cold, what is the geothermal heat input like? Up to 68C water, but what’s the flow rate?
Are you looking to replace the existing glass, or add a second layer?
You’re at quite a low latitude, so there should be plenty of solar input. Wouldn’t it make more sense to add “shutters” – nighttime blankets or insulation, which would stop the heat escaping during the night, without reducing insolation during the day? Slightly labour-intensive to close them every night and open them every morning, but very simple. They’re used in some commercial greenhouses.
*
#3 written by KAD
about 2 months ago

Hi Tom,

Thank you for your clarifying questions…great points! To answer your questions, flowrate on geothermal hot water varies throughout the day. In the afternoon, the spring is used to refill the large swimming pool on premises. During the night time, we’ll have maximum flow rate. My best guess for the moment (I will determine this spec for you) is that at minimum we’ll have a few gallons per minute excess during pool filling time and maximum flow is equivalent to the afternoon rate which equals enough to fill at meter deep, 30 meter long pool in an hour or two.

In terms of adding a second layer, the answer will be determined by the current strength of the support beams and frames. Rich now, I would assume that the current structure would not support a second layer and may not be able to support a heavier layer than currently exists. To add shutters, we’ll definitely need to replace the current structure and framing which probably has to be done in any scenario. I love the idea of shutters to deal with the daily differential. We may be able to develop swivels to lessen the work time involved. In other comments, we have seen an idea to make smaller square panels in order to deal with expansion and contraction issues. We’ll definitely test for this and see if they can be combined
*
#4 written by Nergui Dorj
about 2 months ago

Dear Tom and Ken,

I also like the idea of shutters. Just one quick question: can we find a technology that can help to expand the growing season to whole year
*
#5 written by KAD
about 2 months ago

A few follow ups:

- Apologies bikerider for not commenting on the thermal mass idea earlier. Shelving these would be a possibility and redirecting light or heat to this set of shelves would be very doable.

- There is a lot of technology that can accommodate growing throughout the year. I’ve had discussions with a hydroponics company in the U.S. who is growing year round with rock wool and verti-gro systems. With the amount of wool we have available, this is one option, similar vertical technology is another option. Also, if we keep the ground warm enough (we should have enough heat to accomplish this). If needed, we could use geothermal to power grow-lights however natural light might suffice.

- Conversations with a local glass artist earlier this week reveal that electric kilns (used for similar purposes) can reach 1800 degrees. We are collaborating on a space & time to to test the above idea.

0
Your rating: None